The Belfast Agreement Signatories

The agreement reaffirmed its commitment to “mutual respect, civil rights and religious freedoms for all in the community.” The multi-party agreement recognised “the importance of respect, understanding and tolerance with regard to linguistic diversity”, in particular with regard to the Irish language, the Ulster Scots and the languages of other ethnic minorities in Northern Ireland, “all of which are part of the cultural richness of the island of Ireland”. These institutional arrangements, which have been established in these three areas, are defined in the agreement as “interdependent and interdependent”. In particular, it is found that the functioning of the Northern Ireland Assembly and the North-South Council of Ministers is “so closely linked that the success of the other depends on the success of the other”, and participation in the North-South Council of Ministers is “one of the essential tasks related to the relevant posts in [Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland]”. The Anglo-Irish Agreement is an agreement between the British and Irish governments. The agreement is promised to the various institutions defined in the multi-party agreement. It also sets out the agreed position of the two governments on the current and future status of Northern Ireland. Both views were recognized as legitimate. For the first time, the Irish Government has accepted, in a binding international agreement, that Northern Ireland should be part of the United Kingdom. [9] The Irish Constitution has also been amended to implicitly recognise Northern Ireland as part of the sovereign territory of the United Kingdom,[7] provided that a majority of the population of the island`s two jurisdictions accepts a united Ireland.

On the other hand, the language of the agreement reflects a change in the legal emphasis placed by the United Kingdom from one for the Union to another for a united Ireland. [9] The agreement therefore left the question of future sovereignty over Northern Ireland indefinitely. [10] As part of the agreement, it was proposed to build on the existing Anglo-Irish interparliamentary body. Prior to the agreement, the body was composed only of parliamentarians from the British and Irish parliaments. In 2001, as proposed in the agreement, it was expanded to include parliamentarians from all members of the Anglo-Irish Council. . . .

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